Vote NO on Prop 57: Property Crime in California 2015

Crime in CaliforniaProperty crime is on the rise in California and I can prove it.
 
Annually, the California Attorney General collects, analyzes, and reports statistical data, which provide valid measures of crime and the criminal justice process to government and the citizens of California.
 
On July 2, 2016, California Attorney General Kamala Harris issued a report on Crime in California 2015. The comparative crime tables in this blog were pulled from that report.
 
All of the tables are based on the number of crimes committed per 100,000 population. Population statistics come from the U.S. Bureau of the Census.
 
Pay attention to 2015, because property crimes have increased by an average of 8.1% across the board.
 
Property crime categories:

  • Burglary (the criminal offense of breaking and entering a building illegally for the purose of committing a crime)
  • Larceny/Theft (nonviolent theft is the unauthorized taking and removal of the personal property of another by an individual who intends to permanently deprive the owner of it; a crime against the right of possession)
  • Motor Vehicle Theft (theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle)
  • Arson (the willful or malicious burning of property (as a building) especially with criminal or fraudulent intent).

Property Crime in California 2010-2015

Year(s)TotalBurglaryMotor Vehicle
Theft
Larceny-TheftArson
20151,023,828197,189170,788655,8517,380
2014946,682202,556151,790592,3367,135
20131,018,333231,909165,217621,2077,446
20121,048,764245,601168,516634,6477,519
2011974,666230,334147,030597,3027,164
2010981,523228,672152,494600,3577,864
Number per 100,000 Population

Property Crime in California 2010-2015

Year(s)TotalBurglaryMotor Vehicle
Theft
Larceny-TheftArson
2014-20158.1-2.612.510.73.4
2013-2014-7.0-12.7-8.1-3.6-4.2
2012-2013-2.9-5.6-2.0-2.1-1.0
2011-20127.66.614.66.35.0
2010-20110.70.7-3.6-0.5-8.9
2010-20154.3-13.812.09.2-6.2
Percentage Change per 100,000 Population
Year(s)TotalBurglaryMotor Vehicle
Theft
Larceny
Theft
Arson
20151,023,828197,189 170,788 655,851 7,380
2014946,682 202,556 151,790 592,3367,135
20031,209,030 240,705 240,798727,527 13,677
19931,676,990 413,671 319,225 944,094 20,343

Property Crime in California 1993-2015

Year(s)TotalBurglaryMotor Vehicle
Theft
Larceny
Theft
Arson
2014 to 2015+8.15-2.65+12.51+10.72+3.43
2003 to 2014-21.70-15.85-36.96-18.58-47.83
1993 to 2003-27.9-41.81-25.77-22.94-32.77
Percentage Change per 100,000 Population

Vote NO on Prop 57: Violent Crime in California 2015

Violent and property crime are on the rise in California and I can prove it.
 
Annually, the California Attorney General collects, analyzes, and reports statistical data, which provide valid measures of crime and the criminal justice process to government and the citizens of California.
 
On July 1, 2016 Attorney General Kamala Harris issued a report on Crime in California 2015. The comparative crime tables in this blog were pulled from that report.
 
All of the tables are based on the number of crimes committed per 100,000 population. Population statistics come from the U.S. Bureau of the Census.
 
Pay attention to 2015, because violent crime increased by an average of 10% across all categories.
 
Violent crime categories:

  • Murder (the killing of a human being by a sane person, with intent, malice aforethought (prior intention to kill the particular victim or anyone who gets in the way) and with no legal excuse or authority)
  • Rape (non-conseusual sexual intercourse that is committed by physical force, threat of injury, or other durress)
  • Robbery (the taking of money or goods in the possession of another, from his or her person or immediate presence, by force or intimidation) and
  • Aggravated Assault (an attempt to cause serious bodily injury to another or cause such injury purposely, knowing, or recklessly under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life; or attempts to cause or purposely or knowingly cause bodily injury to another with a deadly weapon).

Violent Crime in California 2010-2015

YearTotalHomicideRapeRobberyAggravated
Assault
2015166,5881,86112,79352,78599,149
2014151,4251,6979,39748,65091,681
2013151,6341,7457,45953,62188,809
2012160,6291,8787,82856,49194,432
2011155,3131,7947,67854,35891,483
2010163,9571,8098,32558,10095723
Number per 100,000 Population

Violent Crime in California 2010-2015

Year(s)TotalHomicideRapeRobberyAggravated
Assault
2014 to 201510.09.78.58.1
2013 to 2014-0.1-2.8-9.33.2
2012 to 2013-5.6-7.1-4.7-5.1-6.0
2011 to 20123.44.72.03.93.2
2010 to 2011-5.3-0.8-7.8-6.4-4.4
2010 to 20151.62.9-9.13.6
Percentage Change per 100,000 Population

Violent Crime in California 1993-2015

Year(s)TotalHomicideRapeRobberyAggravated
Assault
2015166,5881,86112,79352,78599,149
2014151,4251,6979,39748,65091,681
2003204,5912,4029,91863,597128,674
1993336,1104,09511,574126,347193,904
Number per 100,000 Population

Violent Crime in California 1993-2015

YearsTotalHomicideRapeRobberyAggravated
Assault
2014 to 2015+10.01+9.66+36.14+8.50+8.15
2003 to 2014-25.9929.355.25-23.5028.73
1993 to 2003-39.13-41.34-14.31-49.66-33.64
Percentage Change per 100,000 Population

A Small Act of Kindness: My Meeting With Joe Biden

Shortly after the truth was revealed about the death of my daughter Polly I met with a powerful politician. During the course of our fifteen minutes together or perhaps it was thirty; I experienced an act of compassion and kindness that retains a special place in my heart. The meeting did not change my life, indeed my life had been profoundly changed in the month prior to the meeting, but it did provide me with insight, clarity and a sense of hope that had heretofore escaped my grasp.
 
In December 1993, I was invited to Washington DC to meet with President Clinton. During the course of my three days in the nation’s capitol, and for a variety of reasons, I was afforded extraordinary access to America’s political elite. Many of them wanted to strengthen their law and order credentials in preparation for the next year’s election, because public safety was a primary issue of the day. I know that a few tried to enlist me to carry water for their pet criminal justice legislation. Perhaps some of them were simply being kind in the face of personal tragedy. However, there is no doubt that I represented the novelty of the moment because one powerful Congressman declared that people like me represented a “dog and pony show”.
 
Unfortunately, I have been unable to retain many of the details from that profoundly sad time in my life. Like a legally, but not totally blind person who sees outlines but not detail, my heavy veil of sadness filtered detail leaving impressions with varying degrees of clarity. I do remember being shuttled among offices and meeting a variety of Senators and Congresspersons. Always surrounded by staffers, they would sit with me for a few minutes, express their condolence, talk about their pet projects and we would pose for the inevitable meet and greet photo.
 
At one point I wakded alone into a beautifully appointed but darkened room. Senator Joe Biden was seated on an easy chair in front of his desk. He was alone. There were no aides or handlers anywhere in sight. The Senator motioned for me to sit on a matching chair across from him, about three feet away. In a quiet voice he told me to call him Joe. He expressed his condolence as had so many before.
 
Then, as is Joe Biden’s style, he filibustered for the next several minutes. Quietly and with great compassion, he recounted the story of his own tragedy. He talked about losing his young wife and infant daughter in a catastrophic automobile accident when he was first elected to the United States Senate. He told me about his personal anguish and his moral crisis. He showed me an object; a gift from his deceased wife that he always keeps on his desk as a reminder of her love. Not her loss. He asked me how I was doing. We chatted. He talked about strength, family and faith. When we concluded Joe hugged me and wished me well.
 
For a brief moment in time we were simply two men who had experienced profound loss, but in truth I was the recipient of a gift. More than anything else Senator Biden served as an example of how to reconstruct a shattered life. If he could recover after having lost so much; if he could live a life of dignity and accomplishment then so could I. I have had many encounters with the Senator since then, but the subject of the meeting has never come up. I share this personal moment because it is important that people understand that Vice President Biden stands apart as a politician and as a man.

Violent Crime in California 2010-2015

Table 1: Violent Crime in California
Number per 100,000 population

Violent Crime in California 2010-2015

YearTotalHomicideRapeRobberyAggravated
Assault
2015166,5881,86112,79352,78599,149
2014151,4251,6979,39748,65091,681
2013151,6341,7457,45953,62188,809
2012160,6291,8787,82856,49194,432
2011155,3131,7947,67854,35891,483
2010163,9571,8098,32558,10095723
Number per 100,000 Population
Table 2: Violent Crime in California
Percentage change

Phillip Garrido: Coming To A Neighborhood Near You

GarridoIn order to comply with a Federal mandate to ease prison overcrowding California has employed numerous “Get Out Of Jail Free” cards. In 2011, AB 109 shuttled thousands of felons from prisons into county jails. In 2014, Prop. 47 reclassified most “non-serious and non-violent property and drug crimes” from felonies to misdemeanors, further emptying our state prisons.
 
After the prison population met the federal threshold Governor Brown doubled down on Proposition 57, which, if passed, will put thousands of dangerous felons back on our streets.
 
Now we learn that the monster who kidnapped and held Jaycee Dugard in sexual slavery for 18-years will be eligible for release from prison 406-years early because of something called the Elderly Parole Program.
 .
In 1991, after multiple convictions for rape and kidnapping, Phillip Garrido and his wife Nancy kidnapped 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard from a school bus stop in Lake Tahoe, California. They kept her prisoner and sexually abused her for 18-years. On June 2, 2011, Phillip Garrido pled guilty to multiple counts of kidnapping and rape. He was sentenced to 431 years behind bars for the crimes he admitted committing against Jaycee Dugard.
 
The Elderly Parole Program allows Phillip Garrido to legally petition for parole as early as 2034. According to California’s Prison Law Office the Elderly Parole Program, “Requires the state to put in place a new parole process so that prisoners who are 60 years of age or older and have been incarcerated at least 25 years on their current sentence will be referred to the Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) to determine suitability for parole.”
 
The Elderly Parole Program was mandated by the federal order to relieve overcrowding in California’s prisons. However, that threshold has been achieved. With violent and property crime escalating it is time to rescind the “Get Out Of Jail Free” mentality. Public safety, not empty prisons is one of government’s primary responsibilities.
 
Phillip Garrido is a sexually sadistic psychopath. To entertain the notion that he would ever be eligible for parole diminishes the concept of public safety and redefines the criminal justice system as the justice for criminals system.
 

Insanity

Albert-Einstein (1)“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” Albert Einstein
 
California experienced an unprecedented violent crime wave in the early 1990’s. Criminals were cycling through a turnstile system of ever escalating violence. A calculated combination of good-time credits and rehabilitation programs provided even the most violent felons with a ‘get out of jail free card’, spitting them back into society after serving but a fraction of their sentence.
 
The result was ever-increasing, ever more violent crime. In 1993, there were 4,096 murders and 11,766 rapes in California. By 2014, those numbers had been reduced to 1,699 murders and 8,398 rapes. The reasons for the precipitous drop in crime have been long debated. However, one cannot overlook the series of ‘tough on crime’ measures that were legislated to curb the swelling crime rates:

  • “Truth in Sentencing” guaranteed that violent, serious felons would serve at least 85% of the sentence imposed by the judge
  • “Three Strikes & You’re Out” held violent and serious felons accountable for their criminal histories through sentence enhancements
  • “Megan’s Law” required sex offenders to register with local authorities, and that the public has access to that information
  • President Clinton’s 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act put 100,000 more police on our streets.

By 1999, violent and property crime had been cut in half in California. Those numbers held steady until 2014. However, the price paid for safer streets was an increased prison population. In 2006, California’s prison population peaked at 163,000. In 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the state to reduce the prison population to 114,000. The court said that conditions in California’s overcrowded prisons were so bad that they violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment.
 
In response, Governor Brown signed Assembly Bill (AB) 109 in 2011. The goal of AB 109 was to transfer responsibility for incarceration and supervision of certain non-violent, low-risk offenders from the State to its 58 counties, meaning that convicts were transferred from state prisons to county jails. By June 2014, the prison population stood at 135,484. In November 2014, California voters passed Proposition 47, reducing the classification of most “non-serious and non-violent property and drug crimes” from felonies to misdemeanors.
 
The rationale for AB 109 and Prop. 47 was to reduce prison overcrowding, and they achieved that goal. On January 29, 2015 California’s inmate population dipped below the maximum level set by the court for the first time.
 
Case closed? Not on your life! Governor Brown has since qualified Proposition 57 for the 2016 ballot. The so called “Public Safety & Rehabilitation Act” will provide early release to tens of thousands of violent, dangerous and career criminals by using a calculated combination of good-time credits and rehabilitation programs. It will further overturn key provisions of Marsy’s Law, Three Strikes & You’re Out, the Victim’s Bill of Rights, Californians Against Sexual Exploitation Act, and the Gang Violence and Juvenile Crime Prevention Act – measures enacted by the public that have protected victims and made communities safer.
 
In 2015, the F.B.I. and the California Attorney General, issued reports confirming that crime is on the rise for the first time in more than two decades. Given that California has already achieved the federally mandated prison population threshold, as crime rates continue to rise, does it make sense to give early prison release to even more dangerous felons?
 
The evidence is as clear as the trend is disturbing. In 1993, Richard Allen Davis was but one of thousands of vicious, violent criminals given the rehab/good time credit ‘get out of jail free’ card. Within 3-months my daughter Polly was dead because Davis wanted to avoid A.I.D.S. by “getting a young one”. She was just one of 4,096 Californians murdered that year. Violent crime is on the rise yet Governor Brown wants to give early release to thousands of violent felons.
 
If Proposition 57 passes on November 8, we will enter a sinkhole of mayhem and murder that will target our daughters, sisters, mothers and other innocent citizens. To knowingly move down that path is insanity!
 

Vote NO On Proposition 57

CV4Crime victims have always been the “odd fellow out” of the criminal justice system. We’ve never experienced equity with the criminals, are not mentioned in the U.S. Constitution, and until recent times have been treated as an afterthought by the officers of the court. However, in recent decades we have made strides to change this through a series of hard fought victories that have provided us with rights, protected innocent citizens, and held criminals accountable for their actions.

CV3All of that will be torn asunder If California’s Proposition 57 passes on Election Day. Prop 57’s early release clause will provide violent felons with a pathway to early release because it defines obviously violent crimes as non-violent. Rapists, kidnappers, human traffickers, killers and other violent offenders will leave prison well before they have served their sentence. If that happens California will have re-established the same turnstile system of justice that resulted in the kidnap, rape and murder of my daughter Polly as well as unprecedented crime wave we experienced in the 1980-90’s.

CV1Many victims testify against their abuser only because the prosecutor promised that the abuser will be incarcerated for a guaranteed period of time. How safe will they feel knowing that the promise has been broken and the criminal is walking the streets? How many future victims will be willing to testify against a criminal knowing that they can be released at any time? How safe can any of us feel in a world that recycles dangerous felons through a revolving door of escalating violence and diminished consequences?

CV2Proposition 57 is a cynical and dangerous initiative that, if passed, will kneecap crime victims, endanger innocent citizens, and allow vicious felons to be released from prison without consideration for the nature of their crimes.

CV5Ask yourself this question: Should criminals convicted of HUMAN TRAFFICKING involving sex acts with a child be allowed back on the streets before serving their full sentence? If you answered no please join Police, District Attorneys, Crime Victims and local community leaders to stop the insanity by opposing Proposition 57.